Dance Of The Otter

Nigig Niimiwin Otter Dance Native American Ojibwe-style wedding rings

Wedding rings product information

Title: Nigig Niimiwin (Dance Of The Otter)
TypeOjibwe-style graphic overlay wedding ring
Materials
14K white gold, 14K palladium white gold and red gold inlays; interiors of sterling silver
Width:
 0.39 in / 10 mm
Set price from: 2
,047.00 USD* / 2,850.00 CAD* / 2.380 EUR**
Item: RESPECT-2

*Prices are indicative and depend on the current gold price and ring sizes. Shipping costs included, US and Canadian tax rates excluded.

**Prices are indicative and depend on the current gold price and ring sizes. Shipping costs excluded, Dutch BTW included.

Please note that persons who hold a Canadian First Nations status card and live and work on their reserve are generally tax exempt.

PLEASE NOTE: The cost of gold, silver, and platinum is fluctuating weekly. Although prices on this website are being updated on a regular base, they are merely indicative. Contact us for a customized price quotation if you find a set of wedding or clan rings or a piece of jewelry you are interested in ordering. Please do not forget to mention the item number and the exact ring sizes in case you ask for a price quotation for wedding rings or clan rings.

Some considerations when measuring ring sizes:

Since the wider a ring is, the tighter it will fit, please note that your sizes must be measured with a ring sizer (a jeweler's wedding band gauge) of the same width as the rings of your choice.

The best size is usually the ring that fits snugly and gives a little resistance when you take it off. If you have additional questions, please do not hesitate to ask.

*Please mention item# or title of the ring set, and, if possible, your ring sizes

Ojibwe Sky Mide with otter bag

Otter, giver of Medicine and New Life

The above image shows a set of "Graphic overlay" Ojibwe-style wedding rings of 14K white gold with yellow and red gold inlay; the interiors are made of sterling silver. The design of the wedding rings is inspired on the pictographic outline drawing style of the Woodland School Of Art.

Since he had once saved their distant ancestors from extinction by bringing a healing plant (ginebig-washk or “snake root”) from the depths of the waters, the Anishinaabeg consider themselves forever indebted to NIGIG the otter.

According to ancient tradition, WIINABOZHO, the messenger whom GICHI-MANIDOO (the Great Mystery) had ordained to help the People, noticed the poor condition they were in – poverty, sickness and even starvation had plunged them in sheer misery and despair – and he chose the otter to teach them about various remedies and rituals for treating the sick.

The medicine men and women and visionaries of both MIDEWIWIN (The Grand Medicine Lodge) and WAABANOOWIWIN (The Dawn Lodge, a counterpart of the Midewiwin) regarded therefore NIGIG, along with MIKINAAK the turtle, as a symbol of healing and bringer of new life, and they elected him first and leading patron of their powerful Medicine Lodges.

Because of his habit of rising to the surface at night and then plunging under again, NIGIG is symbolically linked with the moon, and thus also associated with several rites of initiation. Because of this, the MIDEG (Mide priests) are still in the habit of keeping their MIDE-MIIGISAAG (sacred Cowry shells) in a NIGIG-MIDEWIYAAN: a bag of otter skin (see inserted image, an image of a Midewiwin "Sky Man" holding an otter medicine bag painted by the late Norval Morrisseau).

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